42° N, 108° W

NOLS Wyss Campus

Welcome to NOLS Wyss Campus

On a Wilderness EMT (WEMT) course at the Wyss Campus, you’ll enjoy the rugged landscape of rural Wyoming as you earn your EMT certification and learn how to respond to emergencies in the wilderness. With two indoor classrooms, easy access to outdoor practice space, cabin-style housing for students, and on-campus meals, our campus is specifically designed for the purpose of teaching wilderness medicine. In addition to spending time in class and studying, you’ll participate in simulated medical scenarios while managing real-life terrain and weather conditions. The Wyss Campus facilities combine cutting-edge, environmentally friendly design with sweeping views of the striking red rock formations of Lander’s Red Canyon. As you learn to care for patients in the outdoors, you’ll also learn how sustainable living and design work in practice. From solar power and composting toilets to geothermal heating and cooling, our campus offers an outstanding example of how to minimize human impact on the land. Join a group of motivated Wilderness EMT students on the Wyss Campus to learn how to respond to medical emergencies--at home and in the backcountry.

Courses in NOLS Wyss Campus

About NOLS Wyss Campus

Information about this location

Founded
2012
Address
222 Red Canyon Road
Lander, WY 82520
Phone
307.332.0116

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When 9-1-1 is not an option, the rules change. If it's your responsibility to recognize, prevent and treat wilderness medicine emergencies, you need to be ready.  Join Us.

WMI

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Read about The WYSS campus

CASE STUDY: IS HYDRATION ALWAYS THE ANSWER?

POSTED BY: TOD SCHIMELPFENIG ON 10/10/18 12:35 PM

You and three friends are hiking through a sandy wash in the desert. Even though it is fall, daytime high temperatures have been 100°F (37.7°C) with no clouds in the sky.

Your group encounters another party of two hikers, one of whom is lying on the ground under the only small juniper in the area. The other hiker seems worried. You ask if everything is ok. One hiker is fine but asks if you can help with the patient, who he worries is dehydrated or having a “heat stroke.”

 Read More on the NOLS blog

Student assessing a patient's eyes in the field

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If you have questions about financial aid / scholarships, contact us here:

NOLS
800-710-6657

customer_service@nols.edu

 

Credit: Jared Steinman